Image: Shiyi Li, ‘Minister of Loneliness’, 2018

New Art West Midlands invites you to the launch of No Limits, the visual arts strategy for the West Midlands, devised following consultation events across the region.

The launch will be followed by a very special performance by artist Shiyi Li of her percussion and live collage work ‘Minister of Loneliness’.

No Limits
Friday 15 November 2019
6 — 8pm

The Studio
The Herbert Art Gallery & Museum
Coventry
FREE
Register for the event here.

Supported using public funding by Arts Council England. Additional support from Coventry Biennial, Birmingham City University, Coventry University, Hereford College of Arts, Staffordshire University, University of Wolverhampton, University of Worcester, International Curators Forum, The Herbert Art Gallery & Museum and The New Art Gallery Walsall.

 

(Image: Shiyi Li, Minister of Loneliness, a collaborative performance involving chamber music, animation and live art performances made in conjunction with international percussionist Gloria Yehilevsky and originally performed by Aisling Reilly).

New Art West Midlands invites you to the launch of No Limits, the visual arts strategy for the West Midlands, devised following consultation events across the region.

The launch will be followed by a very special performance by artist Shiyi Li of her percussion and live collage work ‘Minister of Loneliness’.

Matías Serra Delmar, No particular order, OSB boards, wood, sandbags

Matías Serra Delmar, No particular order, OSB boards, wood, sandbags

No particular order was exhibited as part of Matías Serra Delmar’s degree show at Hereford College of Arts, and was placed outside the main entrance of the Grade II listed brick building. No particular order is a large installation made on 11mm OSB boards, originally made with a total length of 56 foot, from wood and sandbags. Its variable length has now been reconfigured and takes up residence at The Row, cutting through its walls assertively and responding to this specific site.

No particular order utilises and references the raw, DIY materials that can be found encircling construction sites in fast-growing cities around the UK, with Coventry being no exception. The work also refers to the artist’s upbringing. Matías was raised in Argentina, where the socio-economic crisis meant that unfinished buildings could become a part of the day-to-day landscape for decades.

www.matiasserradelmar.co.uk

New Art West Midlands x Coventry Biennial continues in arts venues and historic sites across Coventry until Sunday 24 November 2019.

Matías Serra Delmar, our next New Art West Midlands x Coventry Biennial artist spotlight, exhibits his work at The Row. Matías is a graduate of Hereford College of Arts.

Hereford College of Arts graduate Bob Langridge embarks on a personal journey of reconnection with the natural world in his photographic series, Hell Lane. Exhibited at Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery as part of New Art West Midlands 2018, the project comprises hours of analogue exposure time within Dorset’s enigmatic hollow-ways.

Instinctively, Langridge turns to large format film in order to produce imagery that envelops a contemplative relationship with his subject. He slows down the often automated 21st Century processes of image-making, and reverts to a painterly aesthetic – one which captures the nuances of light and the motion of foliage over time. Langridge’s Hell Lane is on display until 6 May.

 

 

Selina Oakes: Landscape is a major part of your practice. What does the notion of landscape mean to you?

Bob Langridge: Landscape means something different depending on its context. A painter or walker sees it in a different way to a person working in farming. I began making work in landscape as way of experimenting. I wanted to use large format film and for me the best environment to do that was to work in a landscape as a photographer. What I discovered was that by using large format film I was forced to slow down and consider what I was doing. The slower I worked, the more I became aware of my surroundings. I began to notice the subtle changes of light and colour and those things photography cannot capture – like birdsong and the rustle of vegetation when the wind blows. This helped me to become more considered about composition. I also realised that I was looking for something else; a way to express more than just the geographical features. I was looking for a connection or a story and that is what landscape is to me.

Experimentation continued with Hell Lane. I decided to use a pinhole camera to see what I could produce. It would be flippant to say it is down to chance but one cannot look through the viewfinder of the camera I had, so I used a medium format film camera to check that the composition was okay. Exposure for the images was either eight and a half or 17 minutes. During that time the light can change significantly. It also allowed me time to sit and reflect on my surroundings. At some point it clicked that hundreds of years ago someone else would have trod the same path as I was now.

 

SO: The series Hell Lane was inspired by Robert Macfarlane’s book Holloway. How does this publication inform your work?

BL: I came across Holloway in a roundabout fashion. While photographing on The Long Mynd in the Shropshire Hills, I became interested in the little paths created by the livestock. I started to research the old trade routes beginning with The Drovers’ Roads of Wales by Fay Godwin and Shirley Toulson. This led me on to searching for local “green lanes” to photograph. My tutor, Clare Smith, suggested Macfarlane’s book. I found it wonderfully written and it has some fabulous illustrations. I became interested in searching for the sunken routes. Holloway was that intangible something extra I had been looking for. Macfarlane’s work, and that of Hamish Fulton, led me to question how I could represent a place in a way that went beyond documentary.

 

SO: Time is a significant part of your imagery. Can you discuss how time – particularly slow time – is folded into your artistic process and images?

BL: By its very nature photography is a two-dimensional art. Robert Adams writes that landscape pictures provide “three verities – geography, autobiography, and metaphor.” When these attributes combine, they “strengthen each other and reinforce what we all work to keep intact – an affection for life.” When working on Hell Lane I knew that I wanted to find a way of representing what these routes had come to mean to me. For me the use of long exposure times provides the images with more than simple reportage can. There seems to be a sense of something happening. I hope that I have managed to capture a sense of the place.

I wonder if in part my approach to my work developed as a reaction to the instantaneousness of current photography. We wander around and all we see is our screens – even our friends see our images minutes after they have been taken. As photographers, we learn that photography is a choice: a choice of what to include in, and what to exclude from, the frame. We choose where to shoot from and when to shoot. If we are lucky, we also realise that there are times when we need to put down the camera and be in the moment.

 

SO: As an artist, you have built a deep understanding of Dorset’s hollow-ways. What sentiments do you wish to communicate to the viewer?

BL: I don’t think at any point in the making of Hell Lane I considered what I wanted a viewer to get. I hope they are intrigued and drawn into the images.  The feedback I have had so far has ranged from being mysterious to being sinister.

 

SO: How has New Art West Midlands and the show at Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery supported the transition from Hereford College of Arts to life post-graduation?

BL: Being part of New Art West Midlands has been a real bonus. In revisiting my work and its predecessors as I prepared for the exhibition, I had moments of revelations and picked up bits that I had not noticed before. I have started to develop ideas for work that I had put to one side as I focused in on Hell Lane, so in that respect it has given me a real boost.

Hereford College of Arts graduate and New Art West Midlands exhibitor Bob Langridge speaks to Selina Oakes.

BA (Hons) Photography students at Free Range 2017

Graduates of Hereford College of Arts Photography programme have enjoyed recent success at the annual Free Range graduate show in London.

Taking place the the Old Truman Brewery on Brick Lane, it aims to showcase some of the best graduate talent from around the country through a large-scale public exhibition of fine art, photography, illustration, architecture and interior design.

This year, BA (Hons) Photography students exhibiting as the ‘HCA Collective’ won the ‘Best Collective’ award, beating many other universities and colleges to claim the prize.

Alex Thimm, Course Leader, BA (Hons) Photography at Hereford College of Arts, said:

“We pride ourselves in enabling students to develop a unique voice within contemporary photographic practice and the success at Free-Range showed how much students achieve at HCA.”

www.free-range.org.uk
www.hca.ac.uk

Graduates of Hereford College of Arts Photography programme have enjoyed recent success at the annual Free Range graduate show in London.

Larissa Shaw, Flesh Party, 2017

28 artists have been selected for the exhibition, New Art West Midlands 2018 which will take place at Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery, Herbert Art Gallery & Museum, Coventry and Airspace Gallery, Stoke-on-Trent in February to May 2018.

 

Larissa Shaw, Flesh Party, 2017

The artists are recent graduates from the West Midlands region’s six leading art schools at BA, MA and PhD levels:

Nicola Arnold, University of Worcester

George Caswell, Birmingham City University

Aileen Doherty, Birmingham City University

Jez Dolan, Birmingham City University

Amrit Doll, Birmingham City University

Gem Douglas, Birmingham City University

Jessica Eburne, Coventry University

Louise Hampson, Staffordshire University

Lucy Hanrahan, Birmingham City University

Simon Harris, University of Wolverhampton

Keri Jayne, Staffordshire University

Lisa Kemp, University of Wolverhampton

Bob Langridge, Hereford College of Arts

Bryony Loveridge, Coventry University

Tony McClure, Birmingham City University

Hayley McNally, University of Wolverhampton

Bayley Morris, Birmingham City University

Olivia Peake, Birmingham City University

David Poole, Birmingham City University

Lewis Pritchard, Staffordshire University

Larissa Shaw, Birmingham City University

Margaret Shuter, Hereford College of Arts

Sarah Walden, Birmingham City University

Lily Wales, Birmingham City University

Grace A Williams, Birmingham City University

Jodie Wingham, Birmingham City University

Darren Withey, Birmingham City University

Valerija Zukova, University of Worcester

Our three selectors of the 2018 edition were Patricia Fleming (Director, Patricia Fleming Projects, Glasgow), Sinead McCarthy (Curator, Liverpool Biennial) and Ingrid Pollard (artist and photographer, London).

The exhibition includes painting, sculpture, digital and sound installations, assemblage, photography, prints and film and video works that reference wide ranging contemporary themes from artificial intelligence, fake news, gender inequality and surveillance to timelessness, interruptions, displacement and glitches, to how our lives are now lived through the screen.

Rachel Bradley, Project Organiser of the annual exhibition said: ‘The selection panel members are very impressed year on year at the diversity and quality of the artists’ work they are able to choose and showcase in the New Art West Midlands exhibitions. The project has now seen 176 artists pass through this early career professional development experience which has made an invaluable contribution to the development of the West Midlands’ visual arts scene over the past six years. It also gives audiences an opportunity to see new work by a new generation of artists.’

New Art West Midlands Exhibition 2018 is led by Birmingham Museums Trust with support from participating host venues. It is funded by Arts Council England alongside Birmingham City University, Coventry University, Hereford College of Arts, Staffordshire University, University of Wolverhampton and University of Worcester.

28 artists have been selected for the exhibition, New Art West Midlands 2018 which will take place at Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery, Herbert Art Gallery & Museum, Coventry and Airspace Gallery, Stoke-on-Trent in February to May 2018.