If Pairing Were Power (tree mannequin detail) Faye Claridge, 2019.

If Pairing Were Power (tree mannequin detail) Faye Claridge, 2019.

We spoke to Faye Claridge about her recent residency at the National Trust’s Dudmaston Estate, and a new project at Ripon Prison and Police Museum.

You have recently finished your work at the National Trust’s Dudmaston Estate. How did you go about working with visitors, volunteers and residents for the project?

The project has been so good to work on, the word ‘journey’ can be overused when talking about experience or development but it genuinely was designed as – and delivered – a journey. I started very openly, introducing myself in an exhibition and using a comments board and meetings to ask visitors, staff, volunteers and residents what they’d recommend to explore or research. I then created a pairing activity, asking everyone to link some of those areas, and any other unexpected objects, places or people connected with Dudmaston. I made a film of pairing suggestions and gathered more with specially-designed comments cards and a shocking pink post box (using that colour as “the opposite of National Trust brown” as one participant put it). After much negotiation and consideration of conservation issues, some of those ‘pairings’ were then able to be made physically, with us moving objects, restaging some of the rooms and creating signs for outdoor pairings. The next stage was asking for responses to the pairings and analysing those to find the most impactful. The top two were very close but the ‘winner’ was suggested by two young visitors, aged 6 and 10.

If Pairing Were Power (one of a series of portraits) Faye Claridge, 2019.

This was the two objects ‘Two Unknown Girls’ and ‘The Boxing Ones’ that went on to inspire the final outcome: ‘If Pairing Were Power’? 

Yes, they said they made that pairing because both objects reminded them of living as brother and sister, “always fighting or in harmony, with no middle ground”, which was relatable to so many visitors. It also chimed with lots of themes of interest at Dudmaston, from the current residents’ family links (especially as twins) and the duality of the estate being National Trust owned and family-occupied. I was really excited to be following children’s perspectives on the property and its history and was able to expand this by creating an artwork that involved their participation as collaborators and models. We decided to bring the children from the painting ‘Two Unknown Girls’ to life, so I made costumes that were part 2D (as if still part of the flat painting) and part traditional costume so they could be worn. With these we made a series of portraits linking to more Dudmaston stories, bringing together children from a local boxing club, the family that nominated the pairing, my own children and the two children that live on site (a National Trust gardener’s son and a descendant of the original Dudmaston-owning family). I placed the photographs among the family pictures throughout the hall, inserting fictitious relations, and created two mannequins so visitors discover one dreaming in a twin room (surrounded by birdsong and soft whispers) and the other high in a tree beyond, with her head and hands transformed into tulips from the original Dutch painting.

The final room in the visit contains contextual information on the project (like a behind the scenes video and reading area) which is also summarised in a small exhibition booklet. I was keen to strike a balance between creating mystery and sharing research, which is not always easy. The gallery room also continues to invite responses and some of the reactions have been extremely touching and heartfelt as visitors share feelings and memories inspired by the artwork.

If Pairing Were Power portraits in progress at Telford Amateur Boxing Club, Faye Claridge, 2019.

You have experience of working within many heritage sites. What advice would you give to an artist starting their first collaboration with such places?

It’s not for everyone, but I love the complexities of heritage sites. It takes skill to balance the myriad of needs in a project at a special site, or with a collection, without losing sight of the artistic integrity at the heart of why you’re there. It’s also vital to build really effective relationships because negotiations inevitably have to be made by both sides at some point during development or production and the more trust and understanding you have, the easier it’ll be for any concessions to be worked out. Humour, tea and cake are also must-haves for any project involving people, of course, and nowhere is fuelled by tea and cake quite like the heritage sector!

Archive photograph being discussed by a prisoner at Askham Grange, Faye Claridge, 2019.

 

Can you tell us a little about your upcoming work with Ripon Prison and Police Museum?  

The work for Ripon Prison and Police Museum has so far been extraordinary because I’ve been able to take their archives to present-day prisoners, to explore similarities and differences in their lives and prison experiences. I’ve been organising workshops in HMP Askham Grange so inmates ‘adopt’ a prisoner from the Edwardian and Victorian charges books, I then record them talking about their comparisons and make portraits with them (where possible) to link with the archive mugshots. The results from these workshops will be compiled as a film installation for one of the Victorian cells at the museum.

I proposed working with the prison because it’s really important to include the voices of those most affected by the public image of crime and punishment: present-day prisoners. The museum is part of that public image and the project gives the prisoners a way to share their perspectives and for museum visitors to consider the individual lived experience of justice systems. It also really matters to me that Askham Grange is a women’s prison, for the museum to reflect the complexities of how custody affects families, children and the perception of women’s position in society.

 

If Pairing Were Power returns to Dudmaston from March – September 2020.

Prisoners on Prisoners at Ripon Prison and Police Museum opens in February 2020.

Both projects are supported by Arts Council England.

You can follow all of Faye’s projects through Instagram and Twitter via @fayeclaridge.

 

‘Humour, tea and cake’ – Faye Claridge discusses her recent residency at the National Trust’s Dudmaston Estate, a new project at Ripon Prison and Police Museum, and gives advice on working with heritage sites.

Back in February we held an event with our partners Trust New Art at the National Trust to share some of the experiences, research and results of five Short Residency Awards given to New Art West Midlands alumni artists Larissa Shaw, Lindy Brett, Aileen Doherty, Theo Ellison and Grace A. Williams. An aim of the event was to highlight the value in artists working within heritage contexts, looking at the ways in which artistic practice crossing into new spaces might yield new and sometimes unlikely research possibilities. The artists involved were selected through an open call to all alumni of the New Art West Midlands exhibitions and were asked to make a proposal for research for a particular property following a networking event. It was important that no outcome was expected of the participating artists – rather, this was an opportunity for research, conversation and reflection. These residencies took place from May to October 2018, for a period of five days, each with varying degrees of engagement with staff, collections, audiences, architecture and landscape.

Kate Stoddart, an Independent Curator working with National Trust, and our key contact throughout the project, emphasised concerns for supporting artistic professional development that she shares with New Art West Midlands, especially in the years immediately following graduation. Such residency projects not only provide key opportunities for artists but also allow properties to have access to new voices and views that enrich their own research and their offer to audiences. The project brought together shared ideas  of supporting  continued professional development for the region’s artists – not just at graduate level, but also in the critical years that follow. It was also about introducing and contributing creative intelligence, encouraging new ways of thinking and working at heritage sites which will make for interesting projects and attract new audiences.

Held at Birmingham City University’s Conservatoire and chaired by Professor Catherine Baker, Associate Professor Interdisciplinary Practice at Birmingham School of Art, we heard presentations from the residency artists and staff at each of the National Trust properties involved in the East and West Midlands: The Firs, Ilam Park, Attingham Park, Coughton Court and Mr Straw’s House. These properties were selected via a call for expressions of interest. Kate noted that three of the properties had never before worked with contemporary artists.

Catherine Baker explored in her opening presentation definitions of research in terms of the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) (questions, aims, context and contribution) and creative practice as research in and of itself. Many definitions place a dichotomy between creative practice and research and they remain unclear. Collaborative and interdisciplinary relationships have value for both parties but are not necessarily harmonious. In fact, conflict, disruption and provocation might be more valuable than a settled and comfortable research relationship. For Catherine, research is reliant upon vulnerability, not knowing and even failure. Artists are best used not instrumentally but as partners. In this way, it is new insight, rather than new outcome, that is gained.

Artist Larissa Shaw gave her presentation with Rachel Sharpe, Creative Partnerships Manager at The Firs in Worcestershire, the birthplace of composer Sir Edward Elgar and the place where his ‘genius’ was born. Larissa began by discussing the importance of chance and of the Worcestershire landscape to Elgar’s composition work which offered a starting point for her residency. Her time at The Firs afforded her some distance from her practice and allowed her research to grow and develop into something that might become a physical work in the future. Larissa responded to the residency context by engaging in conversation with volunteers who are ‘home-grown’ Elgar experts. Speaking about her practice with non-arts specialists left her feeling a little vulnerable but support and parameters for working from Rachel enabled a freedom and confidence in her project. Larissa has an orchestral background and the project provided a critical link between that and her artwork. Rachel and Larissa are looking to develop an Arts Council funding application that draws on the “Aeolian harp” – an instrument played by the wind – and they are excited to reflect on the possibilities and conversations ahead.

The Firs

Lindy Brett’s residency was spent at Ilam Park in Derbyshire, supported by Projects Offer, Paul Mortimer. She used medium-format photography, video and sound technologies in the landscape, dividing her days across several weeks to explore ideas of the picturesque and the self-conscious landscape. Lindy conducted oral research with volunteers and staff on their favourite views and aspects of the very large site which dovetailed with Paul’s key concern about what Ilam should be in the twenty-first century, and a renewed importance of this landscape which has inspired artists since the eighteenth century. Some of Lindy’s ideas included camera traps set off by the feet of visitors, frames placed within the landscape and recreating vanished aspects of the site. Both felt that the short nature of the residency (five days) did not account for the induction to the site that was necessary given its scale nor the time it took to explore it. Lindy feels that the experience has given her confidence and opened up new ideas.

Ilam park

Attingham Park near Shrewsbury hosted artist Aileen Doherty. Saraid Jones, Research and Interpretation Officer, started the presentation with an audio described tour of the site, and noted that she was really excited to be out of her comfort zone showcasing Attingham Park in a new way. Aileen’s practice is characterised by natural forms and natural sciences. This was her first residency and she admitted she had no idea how to approach it initially. Aileen split her five days in two parts in July, and tried to get to grips with the scale and the collections of the site where nature is frequently brought inside. In addition to tours, Aileen was able to stay on site and experience it outside visitor hours which was a valuable experience. The split sections allowed reflection on the first part of her experience, and the second half was spent making photographs and drawings of surfaces and textures very close-up. Archival research afforded further insight. Aileen felt that she achieved what her proposal outlined but that the reality of the residency challenged her thinking. Saraid’s team felt relaxed about the non-outcome driven nature of the residency – she found Aileen’s fresh eyes in thinking about details really useful and tried to give her freedom to explore. Aileen was pleased to have support, and to have open-ended and in-depth conversations with staff and volunteers. There are possibilities afoot for future collaboration via a potential outside artwork.

Attingham Park

Emma Dwan O’Reilly explained that Warwickshire’s Coughton Court is a nationally important house (it played a key role in the Gunpowder Plot) owned by a Catholic family who still live on site. Theo Ellison spent his residency on site. Theo found the scale of the house was overwhelming and felt a self-imposed pressure to shoe-horn previous work into this context. Not being able to touch or move any of the collection objects was a source of frustration so he resolved to work with these restrictions of preservation and conservation. He recruited a 3D-scanning company to laser scan rooms and objects within the house and presented some of the ghostly films and stills made using this technology to us. Theo felt his pieces were most successful when they lacked human presence. He found the collision of not being able to do what he wanted to do on site was a fruitful experience that has enabled new ideas and works. He is keen to show some of these works at Coughton Court and elsewhere in the future, and explained that the technology allows the mapped spaces to be endlessly revisited and discussed. Emma noted a big change in Theo’s work from their initial conversations. She was delighted by the work he made and was excited to share this with colleagues. The works produced have clear potential to feedback into the site.

Bedroom Table Scan, Theo Ellison

Grace A Williams spent her residency at Mr Straw’s House in Nottinghamshire, a relatively small and humble former home to the Straw family of grocers, where she particularly explored the role Florence Straw (wife of Mr Straw) played in its history. This line of research fit with her existing interests in the ‘vanishing’ of women and domestic space. Grace found that the staff on site were very helpful and that she was given freedom. The space is full of objects that appear untouched – it is one of the largest collections in the National Trust – which she found a little intimidating. Grace recorded the space within and outside visitor hours through photography positioned at 4ft – the height of Florence – and while she was there she met a visitor who had known her. Grace found that five days was insufficient and she put pressure on herself to make work. In conversations with Abigail Rose, Membership and Visitor Welcome Assistant, conservation, presentation and preservation were discussed. In one tour of the house with a male volunteer guide, Grace found him comically dismissive of Florence – claiming that Florence spent the family money on wallpaper. She found this made her laugh but she was also angry about the comment and will endeavour to feed this back to the site.

Florence Straw, NT Mr Straws House, Film Still, Grace A Williams, 2018.

At the end of the event, we also heard from Emalee Beddoes-Davis, Curator Modern and Contemporary Art, Birmingham Museums Trust; Hetain Patel, Artist and Eira Szadurski, National Trust Creative Producer – Outdoors, who contributed their valuable views to the afternoon’s discussions. The group began by discussing the value artists bring to such sites. Emalee reinforced the fact that this is focussed upon the artist’s subjectivity, thinking, experiences and honesty which moves the site away from a purely institutional voice. An artist has the ability to highlight artifice in this context. Hetain noted that such projects provide artists with new perspectives and time to think outside their usual frame of reference. The group discussed the length of these particular residencies, concluding that neither the artist’s practice nor their thinking, stop after five days – that that is a starting point. This, of course, raises a question of remuneration, Hetain affirming the point that an artist does not underwork on a residency because their reputation is at stake. The group also discussed the issue of presenting research that is unresolved and the uncomfortable nature of this in relation to outcomes and the honest expectation of a non-outcome driven project. For Eira, the value of the residencies lies within the permission given to the artists to ask awkward questions, make criticisms and have opinions. Two-way dialogue, outlined parameters and expectations are all key to making such projects effective.

Rachel Sharpe, from The Firs admitted that she was afraid of the non-outcome prospect at the outset of Larissa’s project but has come to see the importance of this. The Firs, for instance, have arrived at a new understanding of this value which has positive future outcomes for their way of working. She stated “You provided us with a very important platform to have a very different conversation about the site.” Catherine summed up by concluding that it is exactly this knowledge and this experience that is the outcome.

 

Anneka French

 

Back in February we held an event with our partners Trust New Art at the National Trust to share some of the experiences, research and results of five Short Residency Awards given to New Art West Midlands alumni artists Larissa Shaw, Lindy Brett, Aileen Doherty, Theo Ellison and Grace A. Williams.

 


 
Project Assistant brief
National Trust & partners
People’s Landscapes Art Commissions, Peak District, Derbyshire –  an arts trail and arts presence at Edale Country Day – admin & co-ordinator support

 

Job & Person Specification: 

You will be responsible for the final details of planning, co-ordinating and delivery an arts presence at a Country day event on 9th June 2019 and assisting of the delivery of an art trail opening 5/6 July 2019.

Role: Project assistant
Responsible to: Creative Producer Kate Stoddart, Creative Producer, People’s Landscapes Art Commission and Katherine Clark, National Trust
Fee: Fee & travel £7000  (30 days @ £200, plus £1000 expenses)
Contract:  Fixed 4 months
Place of work: Own work place & hot desk provided at National Trust bases in the Peak District, some travel involved – must be able to reach Edale area
Dates: Start end April – end July 2019

Context of role:

In 2019, the National Trust is asking people to look beyond the ‘green and pleasant’ and explore the radical cultural heritage of places and landscapes where people made their own history. From the site of the Kinder Scout Mass Trespass in Derbyshire to former colliery sites along the Durham coastline, the Tolpuddle Tree and Quarry Bank Mill/Dunham Massey, the National Trust cares for a number of landscapes where people gathered to make their voices heard to effect social change.
People’s Landscapes art commissions & public programme is one of the main strands of this ambitious, multi-site project in 2019, responding to histories of protest at four sites cared for by National Trust. The aims of this are for new and existing audiences to build deeper connections with National Trust landscapes, a stronger profile of the social histories of these places and a wider understanding that National Trust landscapes are ‘for everyone’.
https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/features/peoples-landscapes-explore-the-places-that-have-shaped-the-nation

People involved:

The National Trust High Peak team are working with Creative Producers and artist Jeremy Deller as Collaborator & Artistic Advisor, to develop an overall vision for the Commissioning Programme so that there is a shared vision to the activity at each of the sites. Jeremy Deller has been working on the Kinder project since September 2018, to understand the history, the landscapes and the conservation strategies, and has begun creative conversations around future themes and proposals. He has introduced Jarvis Cocker who has developed two components of the commission: an arts trail and presence at Edale Country Day.

Role Outline:

Admin, Communication & co-ordination relating to the commission. Building up database of contacts/emails for all involved in project. Liaising with all involved in event & confirming booking details Keeping Creative Producer, National Trust & event organisers informed & updated Attend meetings and feed in/feedback  important info. Hands on support up to and on the day (9th June) supporting the team.
 
Knowledge, Skills & experience required:

Relevant experience in the arts/event management & working with artists Some previous project support and administration Ability to supervise volunteers and student placements Knowledge of budgets, finance and co-ordination of projects, record keeping Strong written and verbal communication skills, including some public presentation Ability to work as part of a team and to deadlines IT literate, including Word, Power Point and Excel familiar

To apply:

please send a covering letter (no longer than two pages), detailing your suitability and interest in the position. Please include a recent CV, including the names and contact details of two referees, one of whom should be your current or most recent employer. Please send your application in PDF format via email to kate.stoddart@btinternet.com  with the heading: Project assistant
 
Key information:

Closing date for applications is 18 April 2019 Selection will be on the basis of applications and Skype interviews on 24 & 25 April  All candidates shortlisted for interview will be contacted by email. If you have not heard from us by 23 April please assume that your application has not been successful.

Further information:

The Kinder Story Kinder Scout is the site of the Mass Trespass of 1932.  Like other contemporary protests in the Peak District, people came together from the surrounding polluted cities, where they sought respite and freedom on the moors from low paid and demanding jobs. It is a nationally recognised history which many believe forged the way for open public access to the countryside and the creation of the UK’s National Parks, the Peak District National Park being the first one, created in 1951.

The Kinder Mass Trespass won us all the right to roam across this beautiful landscape. As part of a long term conservation management plan, we work with the reality that Kinder is a fragile place where peat soil, vegetation and wildlife are all becoming established. Some sites are ironically, being ‘loved to death.’ For this project we are looking for ways to encourage new audiences and younger people to come out from the cities again and discover what the countryside can offer.

 
Overall objectives of the Kinder project:

– Engage urban audiences and understand their response to Octavia Hill’s quote ‘The need for quiet…’
– Pass on the mantel of the trespass story to a younger generation for future safekeeping and sharing relevance to contemporary audiences – keeping our cultural heritage alive – involving them in our advisory group and developing volunteering opportunities for them.
– Raising awareness of the High Peak Moors Vision – a landscape scale restoration project which enhances wildlife, air and water quality and is relevant to climate change.

Overall aims of the Kinder project – artist commission and the engagement activity:

– to engage with large numbers via an arts project and digitally with the landscape, using the Kinder story as a starting point
– to work with young people, involving them with the arts project
– to create experiences so young people and audiences become aware of the landscape and are motivated to enjoy, respect and protect it
– to reach young people from Sheffield but also those already more engaged with the countryside, e.g. Young Farmers, Duke of Edinburgh students and Youth Rangers
– to collaborate and maybe co-produce with urban and local partners and tenants
– to involve volunteers in supporting an ambitious project
– to ensure the project has a long lasting legacy of the community’s respectful enjoyment of the landscape and their involvement in caring for it

Partners:

Edale Parish Council, Peak District National Park, Moors for the Future, Sheffield Ramblers, British Mountaineering Council, Eastern Moors Partnership (Youth Rangers), High Peak & Hope Valley Community Rail Partnership (links with schools), Sheffield Environmental Movement (links to Black Men Walking group), Outdoors City Sheffield (link to Asian young women’s group) & more local partnerships.
 
Further information about the role, contact Kate Stoddart kate.stoddart@btinternet.com

Vacancy with our partners at the National Trust for a Project Assistant to work on People’s Landscapes Art Commissions, Peak District, Derbyshire

Image - Florence Straw, NT Mr Straws House, Film Still, Grace A Williams, 2018.

New Art West Midlands and The National Trust warmly invite you to:

Residence & Research
Wednesday 20 February 2019, 2-6pm.
The Lab, Royal Birmingham Conservatoire, Birmingham City University, 200 Jennens Road, Birmingham. B4 7XR

During the Summer of 2018, five artists undertook research residencies with National Trust places across the Midlands, developing new ideas and perspectives in response to the sites – their architecture, the landscape, stories and atmosphere. Reflecting on the outcomes of these five artist residencies, this event explores the value of artist-led research in the context of the heritage site, and the development of future projects.

As well as the five artists – Larissa Shaw, Lindy Brett, Aileen Doherty, Theo Ellison and Grace Williams, joining Dr Catherine Baker on the panel are Emalee Beddoes-Davis, Curator Modern and Contemporary Art, Birmingham Museums Trust; Hetain Patel, Artist and Eira Szadurski, National Trust Creative Producer – Outdoors.

To attend, please RSVP by Wednesday 13 February to Helen Robinson – helen.robinson@nationaltrust.org.uk

During the Summer of 2018, five artists undertook research residencies with National Trust places across the Midlands, developing new ideas and perspectives in response to the sites. On Wednesday 20 February at the Royal Birmingham Conservatoire, New Art West Midlands and The National Trust warmly invite you to reflect on these residences and explore the value of artist-led research in the context of the heritage site, and the development of future projects.

Bedroom Table Scan, Theo Ellison

As part of New Art West Midlands 2018, five artists and alumni of the exhibition were awarded coveted residencies with the National Trust. The residencies are part of an ongoing dialogue that aims to support West Midlands artists as part of Trust New Art, the National Trust’s programme of contemporary arts.

Theo Ellison was awarded a residency at Coughton Court, an imposing Tudor house in Warwickshire closely associated with the Gunpowder Plot of 1605. We spoke to Theo about the residency:

How did you go about the residency? 

I initially found the scenario quite a tricky one to work out – it was a short five-day residency (officially and endearingly termed a micro-residency) in a huge Grade 1 listed gothic stately home laden with so much history. There was no imposed brief or expected outcome from the National Trust, and they were extremely accommodating and supportive, so it was more of a self-imposed pressure to come up with an interesting response.

What did you think of Coughton Court? What inspired you?

For those who haven’t visited Coughton Court, it manages to exude all the grandeur of a gothic country estate whilst somehow keeping things homely. Though that homeliness must have been in part due to the sunny weather and cheery team members, I’d love to return in the Winter on my own to see it in full gothic horror-film mode. I did envisage my time there as being like Jack Nicholson’s in the Overlook Hotel, but it was too pleasant in reality. Its association with the Gunpowder Plot was intriguing, and I was tempted to make some work using fireworks and explosives on the premises, but the conservation team weren’t so keen on the idea…

Unititled (Preservation), Theo Ellison.

Due to the nature of the house and where it’s set were you restricted in how you could work? Did your ideas have to evolve/change as a result?

Yes, absolutely, my ideas evolved directly in response to the restrictions. The first day and a half on-site was overwhelming, and I remember getting the distinct feeling that I was shoehorning in elements of my previous work. It was also frustrating because, understandably, the restrictions over which objects I could get my hands on and what I could re-arrange were wide-ranging. The next day something clicked and I began to make this the focus of my work – that is; ideas surrounding preservation, conservation, and nostalgia. After that things fell into place and the experience helped to push the work forward.

The blue fabric in the photograph is a curtain designed to minimise the amount of light from entering the interior, which over time would gradually fade those interior surfaces. Certain curtains and window shutters would only be opened if strictly necessary, and this felt analogous to the house being set on life support or in solitary confinement. The rest of the project stemmed from there.

Blue Table Scan. Theo Ellison.

Is there anything you have learnt on this residency that you will take with you into other projects?

I learnt a great deal from this residency, particularly about working within my means and using restrictions to my advantage. It was and continues to be an invaluable experience. On top of that, I worked with some fantastic people and was able to utilise some cutting edge laser scanning equipment to gather the intricate details of Coughton Court, and push my work down some new paths.

The scans (pictured) were made using a large laser scanner mounted on a tripod and each room took multiple scans. Again I was looking at ideas surrounding conservation, preservation, permanence and nostalgia. These digital scans will in theory last indefinitely, while the actual Coughton Court requires continual maintenance to prevent it fading away. It is an exploration into our desire of maintaining what exists and of archiving as a response to the fear of loss. In that sense, the project looks to celebrate the educational, historical, and aesthetic value of Coughton Court, but also looks to interlink that with the murkier, more obsessional side of nostalgia.

The project is still ongoing and we scanned as many rooms and elements of the property as possible. I chose to dedicate most of the time to scanning the bedroom and drawing room as both bedroom scenes and game-playing scenes feature heavily within art history, which adds another dialogue and context to work with.

I would like to thank New Art West Midlands and the National Trust for giving me this opportunity; Tom, Rob, and Max from Mowma, curator Kate Stoddart who has been brilliantly supportive, and everyone at Coughton Court including Emma and Anna.

As part of New Art West Midlands 2018, five artists and alumni of the exhibition were awarded coveted residencies with the National Trust. Theo Ellison was awarded a residency at Coughton Court, an imposing Tudor house in Warwickshire closely associated with the Gunpowder Plot of 1605. We spoke to him about his experience.

As part of New Art West Midlands 2018, five artists and alumni of the exhibition were awarded coveted residencies with the National Trust. The residencies are part of an ongoing dialogue that aims to support West Midlands artists as part of Trust New Art, the National Trust’s programme of contemporary arts.

Larissa E Shaw was awarded a residency at The Firs, the birthplace of Sir Edward Elgar. Set in sight of the beautiful rolling Malvern Hills, he took great inspiration from the area. We spoke to Larissa about her experience.

 

How did you go about this residency? Did the National Trust wish you to explore anything in particular? Did they expect a final outcome?

I spent the mornings researching in the archives located at the back of the cottage, and during the afternoon I would be talking with the volunteers and visitors at The Firs.

I found communicating with the volunteers particularly important. Some of the volunteers are, what I and most others would classify as, ‘Elgar experts’. Many had a keen interest in composers across the globe, and have established their own well known societies, so the fluidity between Elgar and the rest of the musical world has been invaluable to me.

I attended talks in the visitor centre were rich in information, and allowed me to see how visitors were educated about Elgar, and more specifically, what they were most interested in.

I also spent a long weekend hiking and camping in the Malvern Hills, where it is believed Elgar often visited to gain inspiration for his works. Interestingly, I have been told by a few different sources that Elgar would have his driver take him to the top of the Hills so he could feed the birds. He would throw the feed up into the air, wait for the birds to land, and then write his scores and manuscripts where the birds landed.

There is a style of music called Aleatoric music, or ‘chance music’. This music, in some element of the composition, is left to chance. It is most associated with procedures in which the chance element involved a limited number of possibilities. An example of this would be to write a stave (the lines which illustrate sheet music) on paper, and hold the paper to the light against a window. The illuminated paper would show blotches of pigments which could be converted into a movement of musical notes ascending (going up), and descending (going down) throughout the score, as well as the rest of the paper. Well known composers of Aleatoric music are Stravinsky (early 1900s) and Henry Cowell (1930s). This method was also was used by visual artists such as Duchamp (1913-1915, interestingly living at the same time as Elgar) and John Cage’s Music of Changes (1951).

The National Trust wanted me to explore what it was about Elgar that sparked his ‘genius’, and how that may spark genius in visitors too. My residency has investigated key moments and events in Elgar’s life that shaped him into one of Britain’s greatest composers. Although The Firs did not expect an outcome (which allowed me enough mental and physical room to do whatever I wished) I plan to write a lot about my time at the property, and hopefully reveal some unknown things about Elgar. I hope in time this will manifest in physical works that will become a dialogue of ongoing investigations in the music world.

What did you think of the house? What inspired you?

I think that it is important for the National Trust to keep the house as it would have been in Elgar’s time for the ongoing education to visitors and for the rest of the music world. I have been to other composers houses such as Eric Satie in Honfleur, Northern France; Johannes Brahms in Baden-Baden, South-West Germany, and M.K. Čiurlionis in Vilnius, Lithuania – all of which are unique in style and showcase the composers’ lives.

What was important and of interest to me, was that The Firs have their own archives, a large part which is now in the British Library.

Is there anything you have learned on this residency that you will take with you into other projects?

I have learned how to interact with public visitors, and how to tailor my approach to different visitors too. I have learnt a lot about the National Trust, how an artist can work within the organisation and how an artist’s work can be useful as a means of delivering information to their visitors.

Within my practice itself, I have research that keenly interests me and has built a bridge connecting my musical education and art practice; something I have been struggling to do for a few years. The work and research made during the residency is definitely something that will occupy me for some time and see me through a number of projects.

As part of New Art West Midlands 2018, five artists and alumni of the exhibition were awarded coveted residencies with the National Trust. Larissa E Shaw was awarded a residency at The Firs, the birthplace of Sir Edward Elgar. Set in sight of the beautiful rolling Malvern Hills, he took great inspiration from the area. We spoke to Larissa about her experience.

Florence Straw, NT Mr Straws House, Film Still, Grace A Williams, 2018.

As part of New Art West Midlands 2018, five artists and alumni of the exhibition were awarded coveted residencies with the National Trust. The residencies are part of an ongoing dialogue that aims to support West Midlands’ artists as part of Trust New Art, the National Trust’s programme of contemporary arts.

Grace A Williams was awarded a residency at Mr Straw’s House in Worksop, Nottinghamshire. The modest semi-detached house was home to a grocer’s family, and has remained virtually unchanged since 1923. Grace has produced a short film of here time there, which can be viewed below:

Grace A Williams, awarded a residency at Mr Straw’s House, a National Trust property as part of New Art West Midlands 2018 shares her experience.

Exhibiting artists, New Art West Midlands 2018

Five artists and alumni of the New Art West Midlands exhibition have been awarded coveted residencies with the National Trust. The winners were announced last night at the preview of the New Art West Midlands 2018 exhibition at Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery.

 

 

Exhibiting artists, New Art West Midlands 2018

 

The artists are Theo Ellison, graduate of Coventry University, who heads to Coughton Court in Warwickshire. Birmingham City University graduates Larissa E Shaw, Aileen Doherty and Grace A Williams will head to The Firs (Worcestershire), Attingham Park (Shropshire) and Mr Straw’s House (Nottinghamshire), respectively. Lindy Brett, from Staffordshire University, will be resident at Ilam Park in Derbyshire.

 

In addition, Nicola Arnold (University of Worcester), Jez Dolan (Birmingham City University) and Olivia Peake (Birmingham City University) were awarded £250 of art supplies from Cass Art.

 

Each residency will last for five days and has a bursary value of £1000. The artists will have the opportunity to create new work inspired by their time with National Trust places, and will share their experiences and ideas at a special event in autumn 2018 with other arts professionals.

 

The residencies are part of an ongoing dialogue between the National Trust and New Art West Midlands that aims to support West Midlands’ artists as part of Trust New Art, the National Trust’s programme of contemporary arts.

 

Kate Stoddart, Curator, supporting Trust New Art, commented: “The short residency format is designed to encourage experimentation and foster innovation. These residences offer new ways of working, allowing artists to engage with a place and develop site-specific responses to the stories, collections and landscapes of the National Trust.”

 

Craig Ashley, Director, New Art West Midlands commented: “Artists who are exhibiting in the current New Art West Midlands 2018 exhibition, or who exhibited in previous exhibitions, were eligible to apply for these awards. We’re delighted to be working with the National Trust in this way, offering brilliant opportunities for artists to gain vital experience right at the start of their careers.”

 

The New Art West Midlands exhibition opens today (16 February) at Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery, with further openings next week at AirSpace Gallery in Stoke-on-Trent and The Herbert Art Gallery & Museum, Coventry. Each of the 28 exhibiting artists has graduated from one of the region’s six art schools within the last three years: Birmingham City University, Coventry University, University of Wolverhampton, University of Worcester, Staffordshire University, and Hereford College of Arts. The exhibition, Five Years On, looking at the work of six New Art West Midlands alumni is also open at Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery.

Five artists and alumni of the New Art West Midlands exhibition have been awarded coveted residencies with the National Trust, alongside three prizes from Cass Art.

The Imitation Archive (2015), video still (c) Matt Parker

Wednesday 1 November, 10am – 2.30pm
Walled Garden Meeting Room, Croome Park, Worcestershire

In the last 6 years, around 15 Trust New Art properties in the Midlands have worked with artists, and are becoming more confident in developing projects and in their understanding of contemporary art. National Trust is not an arts organisation – this has been no barrier to great projects, but how can we explore ways of making deeper connections with artists for the benefit of all? We will look at ways in which artists have worked with other non-arts organisations, and the creative impact on those involved. Where are the meeting points between the priorities as a conservation organisation that wants to attract new audiences through artists’ work, and those of an artist and their practice? And how does creative thinking through an artist in residence foster creative approaches in the workplace at both an operational and strategic level? Artist Matt Parker will talk about his residency at the National Museum Of Computing and how he understands the potential of the residency.

The Imitation Archive (2015), video still (c) Matt Parker

 

This session will be an opportunity to learn more about a new short residency model, with an opportunity for 5 Trust New Art Midlands properties to host micro residencies with New Art West Midlands artists past and present.

10am Meet in Tea Room WW1 base near car park for teas and coffees

10.15 prompt Walk to walled garden meeting room with Rachel

10.20 onwards teas & coffees

Introductions

Informal presentation of case studies of artists working in contexts of heritage, industry and religion.  Craig Ashley & Kate Stoddart

11.30 – 12.30 pm  Matt Parker presents & discussion

12.30 – 1.15 Sandwiches in Walled Garden

(Teas and Coffees available)

1.15 – 2 Croome Projects in partnership and with local groups & discussion – Kiki Claxton & Rachel Sharpe

2pm – 2.30pm Walk around Croome projects led by Kiki & Rachel
Limited places are available for this event, allocated on a first come, first served basis. RSVP to Helen Robinson, Helen.Robinson@nationaltrust.org.uk by 25 October 2017.

 

https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/croome

https://eastsideprojects.org/esp/members-activity/matt-parker-artist-in-residence/

https://www.earthkeptwarm.com/about/

This session will be an opportunity to learn more about a new short residency model with National Trust, with an opportunity for 5 Trust New Art Midlands properties to host micro residencies with New Art West Midlands artists past and present.