ਜ਼ੋਨ Zōna, 2020. Sahjan Kooner.

We are delighted to announce that 6 artists have been selected for our latest round of Studio Visits.

ਜ਼ੋਨ Zōna, 2020. Sahjan Kooner.

Freelance curator Adelaide Bannerman will meet with Bharti Parmar; Ryan Hughes, Artistic Director of Coventry Biennial of Contemporary Art will meet David Saunders; Ikon Gallery Curator Melanie Pocock will meet with Helen Kilby Nelson; artist Harminder Judge will meet Sahjan Kooner; Ian Sergeant will meet Thomas Brown, and artist Permindar Kaur will meet with Rupi Dhillon.

As part of our last round of visits, we are also pleased to announce that Zoë Lippett, Exhibitions & Artists’ Projects Curator at The New Art Gallery Walsall met with Nuala Clooney during November.

Applications were selected by the New Art West Midlands team, in conjunction with the relevant studio visitor.

Each of the current round of studio visits will take place online over the coming weeks. We hope they will be useful and fruitful conversations.

We are delighted to announce that six artists have been selected for our latest round of Studio Visits.

Harminder Judge, Untitled (falling fire) 2020. Courtesy of Jhaveri Contemporary.

We are again offering artists and curators living in the West Midlands region the opportunity to receive an online studio visit or one-to-one session from an artist or curator. This is an opportunity to discuss your work and to seek valuable feedback and practical advice on either artistic or curatorial practice.

We are delighted to announce that the studio visitors for 2020 will be:

Adelaide Bannerman
Harminder Judge
Permindar Kaur
Ryan Hughes
Melanie Pocock
Ian Sergeant

 

Application information

If you would like to apply for a studio visit, please send a short application to info@newartwestmidlands.co.uk for the attention of Annabel Clarke.

You should send a maximum of three images of or links to relevant work, your CV and a summary of no more than 400 words outlining who you would like to meet and why, and how you feel it would help to support and develop your practice. Please send as a single PDF document.

We are committed to widening access to our opportunities. Audio or video recorded applications may be submitted via Vimeo, YouTube or similar by those facing barriers in applying in writing. For further information please email info@newartwestmidlands.co.uk

Applications will be shortlisted by the New Art West Midlands team and a final decision will be made by each studio visitor.

The deadline for applications is 12 noon, Monday 16 November 2020.

Please note: We recognise that not all artists or curators use or require studios. A physical studio space is not required. Meetings will take place on Zoom/Skype/MS Teams as preferred.

 

Studio visitor biographies:

Adelaide Bannerman (she/her) is a freelance curator in the visual arts sector, living and working in London. Bannerman currently works for International Curators Forum, Invisible Dust and commercial gallery Tiwani Contemporary. She initiated the research residency programme, Never Done in 2018, and is a trustee of Idle Women, Lancashire. Covering curation, project management, mentoring and consultation, Bannerman has been practising for 22 years, producing commissions, exhibitions and events. Institutions that she’s worked for include: Iniva (Institute of International Visual Art), Autograph ABP, Arts Council England, Hastings Museum and Art Gallery, Tate, Live Art Development Agency, South London Gallery, Platform London, and the 198 Gallery. More recently she has worked with the organisation PUBLICS in Helsinki, Finland and British Council Australia.

Harminder Judge (b. 1982 Rotherham, UK) is an artist whose practice spans object making, performance and installation. He received his BA in Fine Art from Northumbria University in 2005 and is currently enrolled in the Royal Academy Schools, London. Harminder’s work has engaged with many subjects but there is a continuous exploration of portals, be it spiritual, political, or personal. His performance work has weaved Indian folklore and mysticism with bombastic western pop music and live colour field painting; collided occult inspired dreamscapes with hazy laser penetrated reverse baptisms; and transported field recordings made in his family’s Gurdwara in Punjab across the world, and replayed them through a speaker lodged in his throat. His most recent body of work engages a history of Indian abstract painting related to tantric ritual – borrowing techniques from Italian fresco and Indian reverse glass painting. Grounded in materiality, these ‘augmented plaster’ pieces are talismanic, transportative, negotiating image and object relations, the physical and metaphysical. Harminder won the 2011 Arts Foundation Fellowship Award in performance art and was recently included in Tomorrow:London at White Cube. He has shown work internationally at venues such as Jhaveri Contemporary, Mumbai; Halle 14 Zentrum für Zeitgenössische Kunst, Leipzig; and The Royal Academy of Arts, London. In 2020 he co-curated the group show ‘Our ashes make great fertilizer’ at Public Gallery, London.

Since the 1990s, Nottingham-born artist, Permindar Kaur, has created sculptural objects and installations that explore the territory of cultural identity, home and belonging. She does this by apparently innocent means, invoking childhood and domestic spaces. Little figures and animals fashioned in soft fleece resembling half-stuffed toys are the players in her game. However, these are far from sentimental trophies; the comfort of fabric is checked by the cold contours of copper and steel. Her toys are armed with claws, horns and beaks, belying their apparent vulnerability and giving them an air of comic menace. Others disappear against identically coloured or patterned backgrounds, an elaborate game of hide-and-seek perhaps, or a strategy of camouflage or self-negation? Adaption, mimicry and mirroring: strategies of integration and assimilation. In another group of works, doorways deliberately screened or blocked negate the idea of welcome or the homely”. From Neil Walker’s introduction to Hiding Out exhibition at Djanogly Art Gallery, Nottingham Lakeside Arts, Nottingham. Kaur has exhibited internationally; major solo exhibitions include Hiding Out, Djanogly Art Gallery, Nottingham Lakeside Arts (2014); Untitled, Berwick Gymnasium Art Gallery, Berwick (1999); Comfort of Little Places, Aspex, Portsmouth (1998) and Cold Comfort, Ikon Gallery, Bimingham, Mead Gallery, Coventry (1996). Major group exhibitions include A Vision of Utopia, Spirella Building, Letchworth (2014), What’s Going On? Usher Gallery, Lincoln (2013); Spoilt Rotten: Young Curators, Oriel Davies Gallery, Newtown, Wales (2005); At Home with Art, Tate, London and touring (2000); Hot Air, Granship, Shizouka Arts Centre, Japan (1999); Pictura Britannica, Art from Britain, Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney, Australia (1997); British Art Show 4, Manchester, Edinburgh, Cardiff (1995).

Ryan Hughes is an artist/curator interested in collaboration and what was briefly called the post-internet. He founded and is Artistic Director of Coventry Biennial, an artist-led, social, political and critical platform for contemporary art. The third Coventry Biennial, called HYPER-POSSIBLE, takes place in 2021 as a part of Coventry UK City of Culture 2021.

Melanie Pocock is Curator at Ikon Gallery. Together with Ikon’s Director Jonathan Watkins, she is responsible for the gallery’s artistic programme, including exhibitions, commissions and publications. Prior to joining Ikon in January, she was Assistant Curator at the Institute of Contemporary Arts Singapore (2014 – 19), where she organised more than sixty exhibitions with local, regional and international artists. As a writer, she has contributed to international media and publications including Art-Agenda, ArtAsiaPacific, Art Monthly, Frieze, Kaleidoscope, LEAP, Ocula, The Financial Times, divan | Journal of Accounts, Journal of Curatorial Studies and Third Text. A member of the International Association of Art Critics (AICA), she holds an MA (Distinction) in Curating Contemporary Art (Royal College of Art, 2012).

Ian Sergeant was the Cinema Producer for Midlands Arts Centre (2016-18) and Arts Producer for The Drum Arts Centre (2013-15). He has also worked for Arts Council England (2006-08), Birmingham City Council, Arts Team (2008-09) and New Art Exchange (2009-11).  In a freelance capacity, he has been contracted as an Arts Producer for the Canal & River Trust, as part of Hinterlands (2017-18), and Arts Consultant with the Birmingham Food Council. Education Ian has an MA in Contemporary Curatorial Practice from the School of Art, Birmingham City University. He is currently a Midlands 3 Cities AHRC funded PhD researcher at Birmingham City University. His practice-based research is focused on the Visual Representations and Cultural (Re) Constructions of Black British Masculinities in 21st Century Birmingham. In his capacity as a freelance curator, recent exhibitions include, Reimaging Donald Rodney at Vivid Projects (2016). The exhibition explored the digital embodiment and rich legacy of the late Black British artist Donald Rodney. Forthcoming curated exhibitions include Donald Rodney at the Celine Gallery, Glasgow, and Cut & Mix: Representations of Black British Masculine Identities, at New Art Exchange, Nottingham. He is a member of New Art West Midlands Executive Advisory Group and Film Hub Midlands Advisory Group. He is a director of performing and visual arts organisation Kalaboration, Vivid Projects a non-profit company supporting media arts practice, and Ort Gallery an artist led exhibition space based in the community of Balsall Heath, Birmingham.  

 

We are again offering artists and curators living in the West Midlands region the opportunity to receive an online studio visit or one-to-one session from an artist or curator. This is an opportunity to discuss your work and to seek valuable feedback and practical advice on either artistic or curatorial practice.

Coventry Biennial 2019: programme and exhibiting artists announced

The second edition of Coventry Biennial will be entitled ‘The Twin’ and feature a series of exhibitions, events and activities taking place at various locations across the city – via a-n news

Director of Coventry Biennial of Contempoary Art Ryan Hughes talks to Ollie Noble, who in March exhibited works in the central piazza of University of Warwick, the first exhibition he has ever curated.

We have come to expect expertise in a subject to develop through intensive academic engagement. In the case of contemporary art, this expertise is usually shaped through substantial periods of time in art schools and art history departments. There are other ways of building and developing expertise, ways which lead to very different understandings of a subject and therefore the contexts within which it operates.

Ollie Noble, a fourth year Maths and Physics student at University of Warwick has developed a level of expertise and confidence around contemporary art, not through these ordinary academic routes but through frequently visiting exhibitions and festivals as an audience member. He likes contemporary art. He tells me he has “never actually studied art, I always remember being told that I wasn’t allowed to do it because I was so terrible at it”

Ollie describes being dragged to galleries as a child by his parents where he admits they would spend more time in the cafe than actually looking at the art work, but he also describes how this early experience made him comfortable in gallery surroundings. Later he started visiting commercial galleries in London by himself, eager to engage with contemporary art. He started talking to people during these visits and before long, met artist Neal Jones whilst visiting his show at Southard Reid. Neal encouraged Ollie to try, artists of course being all too aware that learning often happens through doing.

Fast forward to March 2018 and out in the cold opens on the central piazza of University of Warwick, this is the first exhibition Ollie has curated, with no formal experience, but he has managed to garner the support of Mead Gallery and has attracted the participation of high-profile international practitioners including Taus Makhacheva and Enrique Ramírez whose work he discovered whilst visiting the Venice Biennale in 2017.

The exhibition presents a showreel of moving image works which he explains aimed to “take art out of gallery spaces, and directly to the viewers. The aim was to show great art to people from all backgrounds, from regular gallery goers through to people who have absolutely no interest in art”

This mirrors Arts Council Englands aim of ‘great art for everyone’ but attempts to deliver that on a hyperlocal, independant scale, without their support. Why? Because Ollie understands, first hand, the value of looking at art. He explains that he was delighted at how approachable the artists were, he goes on that he “had assumed they would all ignore me, but I emailed them, and amazingly they replied saying they would love to be part of the exhibition. I had the opportunity to include five incredible artists – Fred Bungay, Taus Makhacheva, Enrique Ramirez, Tsubusa Kato and Nayoung Jeong. From the outset I had quite a good idea of what I wanted. With the exhibition being focused on encouraging a new audience to engage with art, I decided that first and foremost it was all about finding sharp contemporary art that had a critical eye and a clear story to tell. Especially in the university environment, I thought it was important that the exhibition showed art that could tackle modern issues head on”.

Ollie tells me what a huge learning curve that this process has been for him, and he speaks very highly of the university environment being a space which encourages this kind of cross-disiplinary, extra-curricula activity. When I ask if he will be curating exhibitions again, he says that he has a few ideas floating about – but echos a concern I’m hearing from artists and curators across the UK, access to space is a real issue.

That being said, Ollie wants to increase diversity in the arts, grow new events inspired by Tate Lates, Digbeth First Friday and London’s Art Night which increase engagement with a wide range of cultural activities and he will “just wait to see who I bump into and what opportunities come up”

Following this exchange Ollie agreed to undertake a short Curatorial Internship with Coventry Biennial of Contemporary Art during which he will be working towards an exhibition and event at the end of Summer 2018.

out in the cold ran from 11-16 March 2018 in The University of Warwick’s central piazza.

Director of Coventry Biennial of Contempoary Art Ryan Hughes talks to Ollie Noble, who in March exhibited works in the central piazza of University of Warwick; the first exhibition he has ever curated.

https://www.a-n.co.uk/news/scene-report-coventry-seizing-new-opportunities-visual-arts

Ryan Hughes reports for a-n news on visual arts activity in Coventry, the 2021 UK City of Culture.

http://thisistomorrow.info/articles/coventry-biennial-of-contemporary-art

Kit Webb reviews Coventry Biennial of Contemporary Art for this is tomorrow.

https://www.axisweb.org/thinking-and-ideas/2017/09/the-future-coventry-biennial-of-contemporary-art/

Axisweb preview the inaugural Coventry Biennial of Contemporary Art.

Kurt Hickson, Dead Painting #2 (2016), Dead Painting (2014), Black Triangle (2016), and Night Fume (2017). Exhibition realised as the result of the last round of Engine Studio Visits.

We are again offering artists and curators living in the West Midlands region the opportunity to receive a studio visit* from an arts professional. This is an opportunity to discuss your work and to seek valuable feedback and practical advice on either artistic or curatorial practice.

Kurt Hickson, Dead Painting #2 (2016), Dead Painting (2014), Black Triangle (2016), and Night Fume (2017). Exhibition realised as the result of the last round of Engine Studio Visits.

We are delighted to announce that this year’s studio visitors will be:

Irene Aristizábal, Nottingham Contemporary
Irene Aristizábal is Head of Exhibitions at Nottingham Contemporary. In 2010, she was the recipient of the H+F Curatorial Grant and worked as Guest Curator at the FRAC Nord Pas de Calais, Dunkirk. Prior to moving to London, she co-directed the not-for-profit space Bétonsalon in Paris. She has curated exhibitions and projects at the Miro Foundation, Barcelona; La Maison Rouge, Paris; the Museum of Health Sciences, Bogota; Form Content, London and LOOP festival, Barcelona.

Lana Bountakidou, Bosse & Baum
Lana Bountakidou is the co-founder and co-director, with Alexandra Warder, of Bosse & Baum, a contemporary art gallery founded in 2013 based in Peckham, London. The gallery promotes new developments in arts and culture, curating site-specific exhibitions, supporting emergent practitioners of art, with a focus on audience development in contemporary visual arts and culture. The gallery has a strong focus on performative art practices, with an active events programme which accompanies exhibitions, bringing current discourses to the attention of new audiences both in the local community and internationally.

Anne de Charmant, Meadow Arts
Born in Geneva (Switzerland) of Hungarian and Italian parentage, Anne de Charmant is a French citizen who feels European above all. Having trained as journalist, she was an arts correspondent for various French and Swiss media and press. Her particular interest in the contemporary visual arts led her to specialise in that field and when the opportunity arose she turned her hand to curating. Meadow Arts is a non-venue based organisation that collaborates with partners across the region, in order to bring excellent contemporary art to underserved areas; often using unusual venues to produce exhibitions, new commissions and events. Meadow Arts has been supported by the Arts Council from early on and is now in its third round of NPO funding.

Seán Elder, Grand Union
Seán Elder is a curator, researcher and writer based in Birmingham. He works with artists to produce writing, exhibitions and public programmes. Past projects include a Anthology of American Folk Song: a Scottish Première of new work by Steve Reinke at Glasgow Film Theatre, tracing the [public] garden wall, with artists Gordon Douglas and Tako Taal, which took place at Glasgow’s historic Botanic Gardens, and a new piece of writing, Hockney’s California, as part of Active Model, an exhibition for Glasgow Open House Festival. Previous to his role as Associate Curator, Grand Union, he conducted independent projects in proximity with organisations including LUX Scotland, The Glasgow School of Art and The Hunterian Art Gallery, University of Glasgow. He has written and spoken on research of Queer aesthetics both in his current writing residency with Cooper Gallery Dundee, as well as CCA Glasgow as part of their Talk See Photography lecture series.

Ryan Hughes, Coventry Biennial of Contemporary Art / Office for Art, Design and Technology
Ryan Hughes is director of Coventry Biennial of Contemporary Art. He has worked extensively in artist-led spaces both nationally and internationally as well as with institutions including museums, universities and local authorities. Additionally, he has made projects in ‘unusual’ locations including churches, mountains, online and in print. He has worked closely with practitioners from various fields including musicians, technologists and writers in addition to many artists and believes that interdisciplinary and collaboration are crucial. He has shown work by Lev Manovich, Radical Software Group, Ryder Ripps, Assemble and Andy Holden whilst also conceiving and delivering professional development programmes for emerging artists including students and recent graduates.

Milika Muritu, Cell Project Space
Milika Muritu is co-founder and Director of exhibitions at Cell Project Space. Recent projects include; ‘Free Traveller’, Yuri Pattison acquired by ZKM Museum, Karlsruhe (2017) ‘Submission/ Critical Mass: Pure Immanence’, Anne De Vries, selected for Berlin Biennial (2016) and ‘Greenhouses’, Aude Pariset, exhibited at ‘ARS 17’, Kiasma, Helsinki (2017). As an RCA Sculpture postgraduate, Muritu continued her Fine Art practice until 2007 exhibiting at 6th Sharjah International Biennial (2004). Appointed by ‘Commissions East’ she produced a public artwork and adjunct publication for ART U NEED (2007). Now working solely as curator she has collaborated in public programmes at Serpentine Gallery, London (2005) Tate Britain (2008), Hayward Gallery (2008), Turner Contemporary (2009) and is visiting lecturer at Camberwell College of Art, Central St Martins School of Art, RCA, and Royal Academy Schools.

If you would like to apply for a studio visit, please send a short application to info@newartwestmidlands.co.uk for the attention of Anneka French.

You should send a maximum of three images of relevant work, your CV and a summary of no more than 300 words outlining who you would like to meet and why, and how you feel it would help to support and develop your practice. Please send as a single PDF document.

Applications will be shortlisted by a panel including Deborah Robinson, Head of Exhibitions, The New Art Gallery Walsall, Anneka French, Project Coordinator, New Art West Midlands and Zoe Lippett, Exhibitions and Artists’ Projects Curator, The New Art Gallery Walsall.

The deadline for applications is 12noon, Friday 3 November 2017.
*We recognise that not all artists or curators have or require studios. The visits can take place at a mutually convenient date and time and an appropriate venue.

 

We are again offering artists and curators living in the West Midlands region the opportunity to receive a studio visit from an arts professional. Application deadline: 12noon, Friday 3 November.

Martin Green. Distracted Anecdote, Stryx, Birmingham.

From 6 to 22 October this year Coventry will see its first Biennial of Contemporary Art. Annabel Clarke caught up with Ryan Hughes, Director of the Coventry Biennial of Contemporary Art and lead artist at Office for Art, Design and Technology to hear more about his plans for the Biennial, and their current crowdfunding campaign.

Why did you decide to organise an Biennial? Why now?

Coventry is a city undergoing significant change and redevelopment. The City Council has recently published an exciting new stratergy for cultural provision to be delivered over a 10 year time frame and there is a high profile bid to become the UK City of Culture for 2021.

There is a really strong performance scene in the city which is led by organisations such as Talking Birds, Shop Front Theatre and Shoot Festival. The city also has a growing visual arts scene with activity regually being delivered by Coventry Artspace and their City Arcadia Gallery as well as other inititives such as Matthew Macaulay‘s Class Room Project Space and The Pod / Collective‘s Coventry Centre for Contemporary Art, housed in a shed designed by Bob and Roberta Smith.

This seems to be the perfect conditions for producing something ambitious, large scale and which can really drive the visual arts for the region. The Biennial form seems most useful for doing that.

Jonathan Baldock. Mask, Glass Box, Coventry.

What should people expect? Are there any aspects that have been confirmed already? Which venues will you be using?

People should expect a city wide, high profile, ambitious and exciting range of exhibitions and events by artists from the city, wider region and from around the world.

The Biennial’s programme is around 75% complete, at this stage, ahead of completing our fundraising campaign and totally confirming our partners. I’m not at liberty to divulge what that programme looks like as things might change. However, there will be several solo exhibitions in addition to many group exhibitions and a large range of parties, talks, symposiums and other activities. All this being said, there are several clues around our programming appearing on our Instagram.

The Biennial will be occupying galleries, studio buildings and public spaces around the city. We’ve also been viewing large, disused and unusual spaces which will be hosting a large portion of our exhibitions and events creating the opportunity for audiences to experience Coventry in a way they wouldn’t ordinarily be able to.

Natalie Seymour. Coalesce, City Arcadia Gallery, Coventry.

You are currently crowdfunding to work with more artists for the Biennial. Why should we donate?

By donating to our Kickstarter page you will be directly supporting artists working in the region. You will also be putting the Biennial into a stronger position as we are approaching other funding bodies, the donations will be used as match funding and will show that there is significant interest in this Biennial happening at local and regional levels.

You can also receive some fantastic rewards by pledging to support us such as limited edition prints, publications or even a private dinner party!

The Kickstarter to support the Biennial runs until Wednesday 26 April. It can be supported here.

From 6 to 22 October this year Coventry will see its first Biennial of Contemporary Art. Annabel Clarke caught up with Ryan Hughes, Director of the Coventry Biennial of Contemporary Art and lead artist at Office for Art, Design and Technology to hear more about his plans for the Biennial, and their current crowdfunding campaign.