Today, Monday 21 December, cultural organisations across the region will showcase a collection of 60 second digital commissions. Marking the Winter Solstice (the shortest day / longest night of the year), It Gets Lighter From Here aims to provide moments of happiness and hope before the days do, quite literally, start to get lighter. To date, the project, the brainchild of The West Midlands Culture Response Unit (WMCRU), has raised £34,050 for commissions, providing vital financial support for the region’s freelancers and community members who have been left unsupported through the pandemic, with a lack of job security and stable, regular income.

47 organisations from a huge cross-section of artists and artforms, have agreed to provide 179 commissions in total, including commitments from BOM, Creative Black Country, Friction Arts, Meadow Arts, Midlands Arts Centre (mac), Severn Arts, University of Worcester, Vivid Projects, and Warwick Arts Centre. Involving a huge cross-section of artists and art-forms, substantial audiences and networks will be reached across the region and beyond, creating a wide celebration of hope, optimism and possibility for the future.

The micro commissions will be searchable on social media through the hashtag #ItGetsLighterFromHere. There will also be a ‘thunderclap’ moment at sunset (around 3.55pm) as all commissioning partners and artists will post content simultaneously, marking the darkest moment of 2020.

James Yarker from Stans Cafe said: “The #ItGetsLighterFromHere one-minute rule will prove a great creative challenge for artists young and old. I can’t wait to see all the inventive solutions they come up with. Audiences will find these snack size art works ‘more-ish’. There will be all sorts of flavours and we can enjoy getting a taste of everything, even those art forms we’ve never experienced before or think we don’t like. It will be for trying everything out because ’something else will be along in a minute’ – literally! 

There is no ‘official programme’ for #ItGetsLighterFromHere, so no one is saying what you can and can’t watch. Experienced and new artists are all in the mix together. It’s an evening for making new discoveries and because it’s all on social media you can share the things you like with all your family, friends and followers.

On the shortest day of the year #ItGetsLighterFromHere will share the brightest West Midlands artistic talent with the world.” 

More information can be found here.

 

On Monday 21 December, cultural organisations across the region will showcase a collection of 60 second digital commissions. Marking the Winter Solstice, It Gets Lighter From Here aims to provide moments of happiness and hope before the days do, quite literally, start to get lighter.

No Particular Order, 2020. Matías Serra Delmar. Mixed media on 11mm OSB board, timber supports, sand bags. Dimensions variable. Image courtesy: Amber Sparrey.

New Art West Midlands x Coventry Biennial alumnus Matías Serra Delmar is currently exhibiting his work No Particular Order in the windows of University of Worcester’s Art House building. It is a University of Worcester exhibition, presented by New Art West Midlands in association with curator Sylvia Theuri, currently New Art West Midlands and International Curators Forum Curator in Residence.

The Art House is University of Worcester’s flexible creative hub in the city centre. Hosting fine art and illustration courses, it provides an open studio, workshop and exhibition space. Located on Castle Street, it was originally built in 1939 as a car showroom for Lord Austin of Austin Motors. It underwent major redevelopment in 2018 to become an additional campus for the University of Worcester. The large showroom windows at the front of the building host exhibitions of work, engaging a wider public and providing a cultural offer to the city.

No Particular Order, 2020. (detail) Matías Serra Delmar. Image courtesy: Amber Sparrey.

First shown in 2019, No Particular Order makes use of the raw materials found encircling construction sites in fast-growing cities across the world. As a Spanish artist raised in Argentina and now based in the UK, Matías is interested in the universal aesthetic of the hoarding and its common purpose to obstruct the view of a landscape in transition.

This artwork includes a nod to Buenos Aires, the artist’s home for some years, where a consequence of the socio-economic crisis meant that unfinished buildings would often remain hidden for decades, behind hoardings that prevailed as the dominant image of the cityscape. Frequently intended as a surface upon which to project the promising future that lies beyond, for Matías the hoarding tends to become the site for a more honest representation of the place in which it stands; a site that is made local, relevant and responsive by those who inhabit the city.

This exhibition is the third in the current series, following a collaborative drawing commission led by artist curator Cedar Lewisohn and Nathaniel Pitt, and most recently an installation by artist Chris Olton. The show forms part of a programme of exhibitions building profile and support for the space. We feltMatías’ work would sit well in the space, relevant to the ever-developing cityscape and the public realm as a key site of cultural experience.

No Particular Order can be seen in the windows of The Art House building until 26 April 2020.

New Art West Midlands x Coventry Biennial alumnus Matías Serra Delmar is currently exhibiting his work No Particular Order in the windows of University of Worcester’s Art House building. It is a University of Worcester exhibition, presented by New Art West Midlands in association with curator Sylvia Theuri, currently New Art West Midlands and International Curators Forum Curator in Residence.