Artist Sarah Byrne exhibited in New Art West Midlands x Coventry Biennial 2019. Having recently completed her Masters degree at the University of Wolverhampton, she has gone on to undertake a residency at The New Art Gallery Walsall. We caught up with her to find out more about her practice, and her approaches to the residency on site and during lockdown.

Clean your hands, 2020, print on A4 paper


How have you approached the residency? What have been your starting points?

The residency largely offered me a space to play, and to try things without too much planning or thought. Something I began to value during my Masters was what I called ‘mindless’ work. It’s like the opposite of being mindfull, which is associated with having to be very present and aware – something which honestly just freaked me out because there are times I didn’t want to be so aware, I just wanted to shut off and let things happen. One of my favourite chefs, Jack Monroe (2019) wrote in the method for her Self Love Stew, that:

“Stirring is key. It is soothing. It is mindless, not mindful. Sod mindful. My mind is full enough. It is a minefield. Sometimes I want to stir some stuff and stare at my hands or into nothing”.

I find it’s a great metaphor for how I try to approach my work now – mindless stirring. Just using the right ingredients, and then letting the flavours come together themselves.

So how I started was by bringing a bunch of materials into the studio without any solid plan, just some notes I’d made on my phone during the months leading up to it. I already understood where my work stood conceptually from recently finishing my Masters, so it was a great opportunity to let the materials take the lead and see what I could allow them to do.

First day in the Artist’s Studio at The New Art Gallery Walsall


Can you tell me more about your work in the lead up to the residency, specifically that as part of your MA and shown during New Art West Midlands x Coventry Biennial?

My practice explores the relationship that I have with my dual nationality, and explores imagery and thoughts relating to my mixed race heritage.

I began with an interest in the photographs and photo albums my mum curated of me growing up. She still keeps and displays them, in leather-bound chronological order on the bookshelf. I began a material exploration of these photographs, viewing myself and my narrative with a different, analytical eye to how I would normally view them. I looked at them at this point as if I were an anthropologist, rather than a family member. The impulsive family snapshot became important, as did the consideration of how I’d grown up with value placed on my race as an identifier, with muddled memories of feeling tokenised by both sides.

As I repeatedly used and re-used the photographs, remembering stories, smells, sounds and emotions, I began to question the reliability of my own narrative voice, becoming aware that I was attempting to recall a period of my childhood which is commonly misremembered by many. I was already going through a process of comparing digital and human memory, and doubts around my attempts to recall events were making me question a degree of computer-like overwriting and corruption within memories. At the time of the New Art West Midlands x Coventry Biennial, the visuals I was creating would explore the ideas of glitching, malfunctioning and faultiness in relation to human memory. The approach of collage on an overhead projector allowed for an ambiguous and infinite number of possible scenarios using a decided collection of existing objects, environments and disruptions.

In the lead up to the end of my MA and my gallery residency, my work had also developed to consider trends relating to skin whitening in South East Asia.  A strong memory I hold from my trips to the Philippines is the overbearing presence of skin whitening treatments. I remember on one trip to the Philippines, after using up all the sun protection cream we’d brought with us from home, my dad and I were searching for more in the local Boots pharmacy equivalent. I remember picking up and examining each of the bottles and being unable to find a product that wasn’t selling itself on its whitening or bleaching properties. The metaphor of fading and bleaching began to be included in the discussion around distortion and concealing in relation to memory.

Me circa 1996, Umingan, Pangasinan, Philippines


How have you utilised materials and motifs?

In the Philippines there is a huge value placed on Westernism. Historically, the Philippines have been owned by both Spain and America, making it a cultural hybrid of these places as well as its geographical location in Asia. Something I observed (and became very uncomfortable with) even as a young child, was that my dad and I were revered for visiting there as white people. People in the markets would stop, stare and point, people would approach us for money, sometimes begging, sometimes threatening. Conversations would revolve around my appearance, with huge worth placed on my “lovely light skin”.

Growing up, this gave me whiplash as I compared it to the treatment I received for being Asian when back home in England. At school, it was a running joke for many that I looked Chinese … My nationality was my identifier, and the way people would introduce me. “This is Sarah – she’s Filipino”, they’d say, pre-empting that the other person would be wondering that already. My descriptors would shift to “lovely olive skin”. Which was I, then? And why did it matter so much?

The bleaching soap was one of the ideas leading the work at the start of the residency as I saw it as an object which could speak of lots of different metaphors and dialogues. My parents had recently been on a visit there, so I asked them to pick me up some of the boxes they saw in the supermarkets!

There’s something to note in that many of the whitening properties lie in women’s cleaning products. I don’t notice the same sort of marketing in the men’s variety of soaps and deodorants. I thought then about the cleaning products themselves, and their purpose. Cleaning. Whitening. Like the intention is to wash your skin colour away. The same language wouldn’t seem out of place on a bottle of Cillit Bang. I started to consider this in parallel with the disintegration and fade treatment in my work.

In addition, another motif which has been important throughout the residency, has been the colour yellow. I did a series of Instagram posts about this, discussing how my instinctual relation of the colour to the Filipino landscape was what initially drew me to the colour, but then how it developed to become something important to continue with. There’s a broad consideration of the colour yellow in reference to Asian countries. It became quickly established in the world that there were black people and there were white people. More recently brown, too, has become a common descriptor. But where did Filipino people belong in these categories? Reclaiming and taking possession of Yellow outside of its former derogatory context gives us a “little flag to fly” (Chok, V. (2016) ‘Yellow’, in The Good Immigrant. London: Unbound, pp.33–44.)

Texture study (detail), 2020, water and soap on acetate, overhead projector


You have shared some really interesting content on Instagram during your residency so far. Given the Covid-19 situation and the residency pause, how do you hope to continue to use digital platforms to share your thinking and research moving forward?

Thank you! The staff at the gallery have been incredibly supportive during this time. I have been continuing my Instagram takeovers on the gallery account, and have been very grateful for the responses I receive on that platform.

With so many of us now staying at home, an at-home art practice is something that I think is important not just on an individual basis, but in terms of sharing and contributing to an online community that others can view or feel involved in. A lockdown practice doesn’t have to be that productive or important, but the act of setting a goal for yourself or having something enjoyable to be working on, can be so important for wellbeing in this weird limbo. I’ve found that since the lockdown has been enforced, the viewing numbers on my Instagram stories have shot up, and the number of responses have increased, as more people are turning to their phones and social media with their extra time.

I’ve found social media, and particularly Instagram stories, to be really positive in encouraging me to write in a voice like I’d write to a mate. It’s not my ‘academic’ voice, or the one that would maybe be present in an artist statement. I don’t do any planning for them, and I barely proofread them. I try to engage my stream of consciousness, and not put pressure on myself to sound a certain way. I’ve personally found this to be very freeing, and based on the responses I’ve had, it has allowed others to get a good insight into how I think through and make decisions around my work as it happens.

On a personal level, documenting this stream of consciousness is also great for me to formalise the ‘bitty’ thoughts that might otherwise be lost and overwritten by the next idea as I potter about with my materials. It leaves more for me to reflect on after the fact, and can be more beneficial in developing those threads further as I progress. It’s definitely something I’ll adopt to featuring more on my personal page after this residency is finished.

Clean your face, 2020, print on A4 paper


What’s next?

I wrote my MA thesis in the style of a book, titled Chinese Burn. It’s in some ways similar to how I voiced my Instagram stories, I aimed to write it in a language that straddled conversational and academic. I didn’t want it to be a book that only my supervisor would read, and would be impenetrable and/or useless to anyone else.

On completion of the book, I had a small handful of copies printed and was pleased that Deborah Robinson at the gallery decided to curate one of the books into the MA show beside my work.  Since giving sneak peaks of it online, I’ve had queries from people wanting to know where they can purchase a copy! I’d love to be able to self-publish it properly, and I’m currently looking into options which I hope to be able to pursue relatively soon.

As my work develops I would be interested in exploring the possibility of more books, perhaps exploring the work I’ve been able to play with during this residency and documenting the thinking and process.

Ultimately, I’ve been saying that the end of my Masters does not equal the end of this body of work. It’s still very much something that’s developing and spitting out new outcomes as it goes. It will be great to return to my studio space at Eagle Works in future when this current dystopian reality is lifted, but for now I’m very grateful for my dining table studio space, and I hope for more sunny Spring weather so I can use my garden to explore sun-bleaching and drawing possibilities.

 

www.sarah-byrne.com/
@sarahqueenofrat

 

Artist Sarah Byrne exhibited in New Art West Midlands x Coventry Biennial 2019. Having recently completed her Masters degree at the University of Wolverhampton, she has gone on to undertake a residency at The New Art Gallery Walsall. We caught up with her to find out more about her practice, and her approaches to the residency on site and during lockdown.

Image: Shiyi Li, ‘Minister of Loneliness’, 2018

New Art West Midlands invites you to the launch of No Limits, the visual arts strategy for the West Midlands, devised following consultation events across the region.

The launch will be followed by a very special performance by artist Shiyi Li of her percussion and live collage work ‘Minister of Loneliness’.

No Limits
Friday 15 November 2019
6 — 8pm

The Studio
The Herbert Art Gallery & Museum
Coventry
FREE
Register for the event here.

Supported using public funding by Arts Council England. Additional support from Coventry Biennial, Birmingham City University, Coventry University, Hereford College of Arts, Staffordshire University, University of Wolverhampton, University of Worcester, International Curators Forum, The Herbert Art Gallery & Museum and The New Art Gallery Walsall.

 

(Image: Shiyi Li, Minister of Loneliness, a collaborative performance involving chamber music, animation and live art performances made in conjunction with international percussionist Gloria Yehilevsky and originally performed by Aisling Reilly).

New Art West Midlands invites you to the launch of No Limits, the visual arts strategy for the West Midlands, devised following consultation events across the region.

The launch will be followed by a very special performance by artist Shiyi Li of her percussion and live collage work ‘Minister of Loneliness’.

Finished tea towels, Sarah Taylor Silverwood

At Wolverhampton School of Art there is a huge range of both traditional and digital printing facilities. I was interested in developing my printing skills, particularly on fabric. I also wanted to interrogate how traditional printing methods can translate a hand drawn image in different ways.

 

Image by Sarah Taylor Silverwood

 

I met early on with Maggie Ayliffe (Head of Visual Arts, Course Leader Painting and Printmaking, and Sculpture and Environmental Art) and Dr Simon Harris (Senior Lecturer in Fine Art) to talk about how the residency could work. They helped work out what print method would work best – I was exploring how to find a traditional, hand produced method that would allow a quick turnaround of a large print run, but still retain the qualities of the original ink drawing. I decided to work with screen printing.

Art schools and art education are constantly under pressure to justify their existence and as an artist and occasional lecturer I was interested in what it meant to be an artist in residence within an art school, and what conversations this position might allow me to enter into. I was interested in ways of conveying collective voices through un-‘institutional’ methods (and by chance the first lecture I visited was on Institutional Critique). When I was at primary school we made those tea towels where everyone draws their face on a small circle of paper, and the tiny sketches are made into a tea towel as a memento for each year. I decided to use the framework of a mass print run of a participatory artwork as a starting point for the residency.

I set up an online form that was circulated to staff, students and alumni, where they could submit 200 characters of text below the question ‘What is an art school?’. This is a question that came up in conversation with Maggie and Simon during our early plans for the residency. During the residency I had a studio in amongst the students, and I visited various lectures and tutorials. Within two weeks I had 80 responses. The responses that came into my inbox varied from the political to the personal: for example, ‘RADICAL DEMOCRACY’, ’the best version of yourself’ and ‘no discrimination’.

 

Work by Sarah Taylor Silverwood on acetate

 

These submissions were the starting point for a large ink drawing incorporating the text and imagery described in the responses. In order to prepare this for print, I scanned the drawing and transferred it to a clear acetate film. Then I took the acetate to the traditional printing department to begin the screen printing process with Andy Roberts (Print Technican), who helped design a set up and production schedule for the two week residency. Andy built two custom sized screens at the size of the tea towels (one for each colour), then exposed them. These were fitted to a rotating printing station. One screen was used to print the red part, and the other for the black part, using specialist fabric ink. A group of students with an interest in screen printing volunteered to help with the print run during career development week.

 

Sarah Taylor Silverwood’s printing process

 

We printed 200 tea towels during the residency. Like the original school portrait tea towels, they act as an archive of a particular time and place. The design and production of this printed work were collaborative. Everyone who left a submission on the online form was given a free tea towel, along with staff and students who were involved in the production.

 

Finished tea towels, Sarah Taylor Silverwood

 

 

www.sarahsilverwood.com/shop/art-school-tea-towel

Sarah Taylor Silverwood reports back from the Engine Micro Residency she undertook at the University of Wolverhampton earlier this year.

Sarah Taylor Silverwood, STS Signmakers, Photo Credit: Ian Edwards 2016

We are pleased to announce the artists selected for our two Engine Micro Residencies taking place this year.

 

Sarah Taylor Silverwood, STS Signmakers, Photo Credit: Ian Edwards 2016

Birmingham-based Sarah Taylor-Silverwood will undertake a residency for two weeks in February at the University of Wolverhampton exploring printmaking, while Worcester-based Suzie Hunt will spend two weeks in January and February in residence at the University of Worcester.

The panel were impressed by both Sarah and Suzie’s approach to the briefs set, specifically the ways in which they proposed to make work and research ideas using the facilities unique to each site. The strengths of both artist’s applications were also found in the ways in which they intended to meaningfully and critically engage with the student communities based at the two universities.

Suzie Hunt, UNIVERSE OF ODDITIES (PLANET), video projection on 5ft plaster dome

Applications were shortlisted by a panel including Deborah Robinson, Head of Exhibitions, The New Art Gallery Walsall, Anneka French, Project Coordinator, New Art West Midlands, S Mark Gubb, Senior Lecturer, Fine Art, University of Worcester and Maggie Ayliffe, Head of Visual Arts, Course Leader Painting and Printmaking, and Sculpture and Environmental Art at University of Wolverhampton.

We are pleased to announce the artists selected for our two Engine Micro Residencies taking place this year.

Image by Sarah Taylor Silverwood

Engine, in partnership with the University of Wolverhampton and University of Worcester are offering micro residency opportunities in January and February 2018 for artists based within the West Midlands.

Image by Sarah Taylor Silverwood


5 February – 16 February 2018

Wolverhampton School of Art: Print Residency
University of Wolverhampton

Engine, in partnership with the University of Wolverhampton, is offering an artist the opportunity to be in residence at the University of Wolverhampton for an intense two week period. Taking place from Monday 5 February, the residency is based at The Wolverhampton School of Art.

The selected artist will be based in a studio in the purpose built Fine Art studios on 7th floor of the School of Art boasting breath-taking aerial views of Wolverhampton and beyond. Access would be during normal university hours (Mon -Fri 8.30am – 8.30pm).

The residency is aimed at a printmaker with an interest in working experimentally between and through our extensive traditional print making studios and the digital printmaking facilities that sit across the School. We are looking for an artist who can make links between the old and the new, and work creatively with the range of facilities to open up a dialogue for students, staff and visitors.

Printmaking facilities include:

Screen Printing Studio
Woodblock/Lino Studio
Intaglio Printing Studio (large press for drypoint/etching)
Large format digital printers – print on paper/fabric/vinyl
Riso printer
Large heat transfer beds – fabric/carpet/ceramic/glass
CNC cutters
Laser cutters
3D printers
Glass and Ceramic Studio
Photographic darkrooms (colour and Black and white)

All these facilities are supported by technicians and academic teams

Week 1: You will have time to explore and test the facilities.  You will have access to facilities and technical support.
Week 2: This week is a University wide Career Development Week. A small group of students will be selected to work with you.

The artist will be paid a fee of £1,000 plus a further £500 towards travel and materials

Accommodation and subsistence costs are not provided.

 

 

22 January – 2 February 2018
The University of Worcester

Engine, in partnership with the University of Worcester, is offering an artist the opportunity to be in residence at the University of Worcester for an intense two week period.  Taking place from Monday 22 January to Friday 2 February, the residency is based at The Garage, Hylton Road, Worcester.

The selected artist will be based in a self-contained studio of approximately 5 x 5m (c400 sq ft) in size.  Access would be during normal university hours (approx. 8.30am  – 6.30pm).  There is potential to work over weekends by special arrangement with technical staff.

The university can offer the following facilities:

Well equipped wood workshop with vacuum forming facilities
Large woodblock printing bed and acid-free etching facilities
Mac suite with all current Adobe Creative Cloud software
Photocopying/printing facilities
Access to advice and support from technicians, based permanently on site
Access to AV equipment including projectors, digital sound-recording equipment, DSLR cameras etc.

Week 1: The students will not be present and the artist will have full access to facilities and technical support.
Week 2: The students will be back for week 2 and it is anticipated that the selected artist will be able to interact with students. Full access to facilities and technical support will still be provided.

The selected artist can work in any medium but applicants are invited to engage with the research interests of the University and more specifically the Fabrication Research Group.  More information can be found here.

“The Fabrication Research Group originated from the Department of Fine Art at the University of Worcester in 2015 to explore questions and ideas relating to practices and processes of fabrication. The group brings together artists, academics, designers, material scientists, digital theorists, engineers, architects, and craftsmen to develop questions about the nature of fabrication in an attempt to establish connections between the making of material things and the social, cultural, political, economic and environmental ecologies in which they are implicated. To fabricate is to make something or to make something up, it concerns both the making of objects and the making of fictions, the construction of things and the narratives told about them.”

The artist will be paid a fee of £1,000 plus a further £500 towards travel and materials. The selected artist is invited to give a presentation on their practice as part of the Garage Lecture Series of public talks delivered in collaboration with Meadow Arts.  An additional fee will be paid for this.

Accommodation and subsistence costs are not provided.

 

 

 

To apply for either residency, please send a summary of no more than 500 words on why you would like to be considered for this opportunity and how it will benefit your practice.

Please send this with a CV, 3 images of your work and your website address if you have one to info@newartwestmidlands.co.uk 

Applications should be sent as a single PDF file. Please state in the subject line which of the two residencies (University of Wolverhampton or University of Worcester) you wish to apply for.

Applications are only open to artists who are based within the West Midlands region.

The deadline for applications is 12noon, Friday 17 November 2017.

Engine, in partnership with the University of Wolverhampton and University of Worcester are offering micro residency opportunities in January and February 2018.

Larissa Shaw, Flesh Party, 2017

28 artists have been selected for the exhibition, New Art West Midlands 2018 which will take place at Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery, Herbert Art Gallery & Museum, Coventry and Airspace Gallery, Stoke-on-Trent in February to May 2018.

 

Larissa Shaw, Flesh Party, 2017

The artists are recent graduates from the West Midlands region’s six leading art schools at BA, MA and PhD levels:

Nicola Arnold, University of Worcester

George Caswell, Birmingham City University

Aileen Doherty, Birmingham City University

Jez Dolan, Birmingham City University

Amrit Doll, Birmingham City University

Gem Douglas, Birmingham City University

Jessica Eburne, Coventry University

Louise Hampson, Staffordshire University

Lucy Hanrahan, Birmingham City University

Simon Harris, University of Wolverhampton

Keri Jayne, Staffordshire University

Lisa Kemp, University of Wolverhampton

Bob Langridge, Hereford College of Arts

Bryony Loveridge, Coventry University

Tony McClure, Birmingham City University

Hayley McNally, University of Wolverhampton

Bayley Morris, Birmingham City University

Olivia Peake, Birmingham City University

David Poole, Birmingham City University

Lewis Pritchard, Staffordshire University

Larissa Shaw, Birmingham City University

Margaret Shuter, Hereford College of Arts

Sarah Walden, Birmingham City University

Lily Wales, Birmingham City University

Grace A Williams, Birmingham City University

Jodie Wingham, Birmingham City University

Darren Withey, Birmingham City University

Valerija Zukova, University of Worcester

Our three selectors of the 2018 edition were Patricia Fleming (Director, Patricia Fleming Projects, Glasgow), Sinead McCarthy (Curator, Liverpool Biennial) and Ingrid Pollard (artist and photographer, London).

The exhibition includes painting, sculpture, digital and sound installations, assemblage, photography, prints and film and video works that reference wide ranging contemporary themes from artificial intelligence, fake news, gender inequality and surveillance to timelessness, interruptions, displacement and glitches, to how our lives are now lived through the screen.

Rachel Bradley, Project Organiser of the annual exhibition said: ‘The selection panel members are very impressed year on year at the diversity and quality of the artists’ work they are able to choose and showcase in the New Art West Midlands exhibitions. The project has now seen 176 artists pass through this early career professional development experience which has made an invaluable contribution to the development of the West Midlands’ visual arts scene over the past six years. It also gives audiences an opportunity to see new work by a new generation of artists.’

New Art West Midlands Exhibition 2018 is led by Birmingham Museums Trust with support from participating host venues. It is funded by Arts Council England alongside Birmingham City University, Coventry University, Hereford College of Arts, Staffordshire University, University of Wolverhampton and University of Worcester.

28 artists have been selected for the exhibition, New Art West Midlands 2018 which will take place at Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery, Herbert Art Gallery & Museum, Coventry and Airspace Gallery, Stoke-on-Trent in February to May 2018.

Aimee Millward, installation shot from Line.Form.Space at Eagle Works Gallery, Wolverhampton.

Aimee Millward was a New Art West Midlands exhibitor in 2016. Now studying for an MA in Fine Art at the University of Wolverhampton, she has recently developed an exhibition in collaboration with Dudley Archives and Local History Centre. Titled Virtual Mirrors (Intersection of the Real and Unreal), the exhibition explores the mapping of the Black Country through new paintings. Locations include Wren’s Nest Estate, Upper and Lower Gornal, Sedgley, Dudley and Wolverhampton.

Aimee Millward, installation shot from Line.Form.Space at Eagle Works Gallery, Wolverhampton.

 

How did the collaboration with Dudley Archives come about?

In the middle of my MA in Fine Art, I was developing and experimenting with new ways to interpret space and place. While producing a painting for the Mander Centre in Wolverhampton I was predominantly referring back to maps found on Google. However, I wanted to physically study some of these maps, so I decided to visit Dudley Archives to view their map collection. After that visit I found out that they had an exhibition space and approached their Senior Archivist Richard Lewis to see whether they would be interested in a collaboration of their maps and my paintings.

Can you tell me more about your fascination with maps and with the Black Country?

I’ve always enjoyed studying maps. It’s a simple pleasure to look at the variety of colours and shapes from a location that you are familiar with. I’m interested in looking at how that landscape has evolved over 150-200 years. I find it interesting how perspectives and locations are changed by looking down on to that environment, instead of studying what is physically around me. The view and sensations of walking through an estate or a public garden is totally different compared to looking down at a 2D map. That estate I have just walked through or the public garden I walk my dog across every day is dramatically simplified into a shape that you could not visualise within that area. The image that is painted on the reflected surface is an abstracted view of a location that has been reworked. The Black Country has a history and wealth of industrial heritage and can still evoke the 19th Century image of a dark and dingy landscape. By taking motifs from maps of this location, I explore and re-interpret the area that I have been surrounded by since birth, using vivid colours to juxtapose with this landscape.

How are you approaching the material through your painting?

For this exhibition I have experimented with painting on mirrors and canvas in acrylic paint. The use of a mirrored surface creates a space within a space. Using a mirror – a real useable object – instead of a traditional canvas surface allows for interaction and juxtaposition between the painted surface with the smooth, sleek reflection and an unreal space and a real space. The painted surface is a space which has been placed on top of a reflected surface that automatically creates a space. Both the painted space and the real space that is now on the other side of the mirror are all reflected, spaces within spaces. I am very interested in the writings of Michel Foucault in relation to his metaphor of a mirror acting as a heterotopia. I use the painting to act as a heterotopia.

By studying the maps I have selected a variety of motifs and reworked the composition, to bring an abstracted view of the Black Country. In some of my paintings I have focussed on one area of the Black Country but looked at maps from different eras. For instance the ‘Museum’, which is analysed by Foucault, contains artefacts from different times and places, one can literally travel through time in one place. In those paintings, motifs have been selected from a specific area alongside motifs from maps approximately 100-200 years previous.

What can visitors to the exhibition expect?

They can expect to view maps in a completely new way, in an imaginative way as something that they would not usually see. My paintings will be shown alongside some selected maps from Dudley Archives so the audience can study my process of developing the compositions and shapes from those maps.

What do you hope the project’s outcomes might be?

I hope to tour this project by maybe using different locations to work with and re-interpret.

What plans are upcoming for your work?

I am nearly coming to the end of my Master’s degree at the University of Wolverhampton and will be exhibiting my work at Wolverhampton Art Gallery – which is very exciting. I am currently expanding my paintings in size and within installation work so I am looking at locations to experiment in and exhibit in.

The exhibition runs Tuesday 6 June – Saturday 19 August 2017.        

 

Aimee Millward was a New Art West Midlands exhibitor in 2016 and has recently developed an exhibition in collaboration with Dudley Archives and Local History Centre titled Virtual Mirrors (Intersection of the Real and Unreal).